Alive In Baghdad Falsely Arrested and Abused in Ramadi

Falsely Arrested and Abused in Ramadi - 09.28.2006
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Global Voices Online » Blog Archive » Iraq: Rare testimony of abuse by the Iraqi National Guard - 09/29/2006 19:07:46

[…] Torture in Iraq, said the UN last week, is “out of control”, and “worse than it has been in the time of Saddam Hussein”. So it was especially timely for Brian Conley at Alive In Baghdad to email me this week to say that he had an interview with a man who claimed he had been beaten and abused by Iraqi security forces in Ramadi: […]


Prae - 10/02/2006 04:45:48

I am saddened and shocked to learn about this. Which authority can we get to solve this problem? Which part of the US government or the UN? What can ordinary citizens around the world do to help?


Steve - 10/02/2006 13:06:28

Ordinary citizens can wield amazing power in these regards. Ironically, it is ordinary citizens who have perhaps the most power because our actions are not constrained by the red tapes of government.

The mass consolidation of power in the US government has made it virtually impossible for even the greatest-willed members of our government to make changes such as this.

The UN, presumably, knows of such things. The current UN structure makes it powerless to deal with things like this. Simply, the US culture of “civil imperialism” is too present in the UN.

It’s up to us. Tell friends. Make calls. Spread the word.


Global Voices Online » Blog Archive » Iraq: Rare testimony of abuse by the Iraqi Security Forces - 10/03/2006 17:14:48

[…] Torture in Iraq, says the UN, is “out of control”, and “worse than it has been in the times of Saddam Hussein”. So it was especially timely for Brian Conley at Alive In Baghdad to e-mail us to say that he had an interview with a man who claims to have been beaten and abused by Iraqi security forces in Ramadi: […]


Friendofpeace - 10/19/2006 05:24:43

Thats horrible and wrong. I feel pain for all the innocent people being hurt and killed in this war.


Joseph - 12/08/2006 03:43:46

One thing that leaves me curious is how the man was released. The start of the story gets the point across, but it appears that it is missing the end of the story. At least in the context of this interview.


David - 12/08/2006 13:54:22

What is presented here is that Americans are overseeing the random beating and torture of innocent people, grabbed while walking home for the pleasure of beating them and to get more names of people so the US army can randomly beat more innocent people.
Is this video supposed to be represenative of all the US forces in Iraq? They, the US, send their army over there to randomly beat people at random.
It would be nice to see some followup footage about an inquiry.
I know of cases where reports of abuse have happend and they were real abuse. Possibly where is a saddist in the area doing such a thing but to leave the impression that this is normal is not credible.
It would be nice to have some follow up footage of either and Iraqi or US person who was there at the time.


Paul - 12/09/2006 21:45:49

hmmm interesting …a video where the beginning is cut off and the end is cut short and his head is hidden ….I’m not too convinced on the innocence of this interview…its lack truth and cut to context.. I don’t know what to say …my sister was a public relations officer for the national guard (in Iraq for a year)…maybe she can see through the walls on this one.


private - 12/16/2006 15:29:39

How do we know he is innocent ? How do we know that he is not one of those who put road side bombs and kills alot of people ? I think we should be critic and not believe on what we see until we know for sure.


Stevie - 12/16/2006 21:15:33

To Paul, this isn’t about whether the man is guilty of attacking U.S. forces. It’s about the fact that U.S. soldiers are torturing people on a regular basis. Nobody, not even a terrorist deserves to be tortured. First of all, it’s inhumane, and for us to call ourselves a civilized nation while enforcing our foreign policy with torture is absurd. Secondly, from a tactical standpoint it’s a horrible idea. It only creates further resentment towards bringing about any kind of change. To the person who didn’t have the guts to post their name or contact information if you want remain “a critic” of this testimonial I’d like to remind you in this country we’re innocent until proven guilty, not sure if you forgot about that little stipulation. So please, don’t lower yourself to such a pathetic argument. I only hope if you ever come into a troubling situation that an officer of law doesn’t have the same negative attitude you do.


Ahmed - 12/17/2006 11:06:29

Thanks to the US we don’t have to dig anymore for mass graves, we find the dead all around Bagdad itself.
Before the invasion Iraq and its people suffered for 13 years of a genocidal, inhumane economic sanction, which if imposed on other nations, would have been dubbed as “Genocide” or even “Holocaust”. What did Bush got from his adventure? An error (or failure if you wish) is a case when a single individual or group, commits. Not the leadership of the greatest and most powerful nation on earth with its almost infinite resources (without considering the fact of a pre-meditated, deliberate act of war waged against a sovereign, UN member country) that led to the destruction of an entire nation, the loss of hundreds of thousands of innocent lives, thousands of US soldiers lives, countless billions of US$, the destabilization of the regions geo-political map for at least a 3 generations.
And, most of all, the eruption of anger & hatred in the minds and hearts of millions (not necessarily Muslims) towards the US and its allies (including Israel), which consequently means the most fertile ground for breeding of, what so called, terrorists.
So the intention, if there was one, of eliminating terror threat, back-fired.
Is it really about the democracy in the Middle East? And is it worth like this?
Democracy is not a gift to be given or taken away; it is hard earned experience (without the need for examples), we need only to remember that Hitler took power in a democratic process (ill or sound).
Is this leadership worth governing? Is it to be trusted? Where is it leading you? Is it safe to follow a man who thinks he has the Devine entity by his side? Why not let Bin Laden rule the White House (he also thinks that Allah is with him)? Which of the two is better?
Both lead to the apocalypse.


Alive In Baghdad - 04/10/2007 12:20:16

[…] Alive in Baghdad has repeatedly discussed the use of torture in Iraq, including publishing photos of the injuries of alleged torture victims and a video interview with another man who claims to have been tortured by Iraqi security forces in Ramadi. This week’s video is our attempt to continue the discussion of torture in Iraq, shedding light on an important, and often overlooked, element of the Iraq war. […]


Iraq: Rare testimony of abuse by the Iraqi Security Forces [via GV/WITNESS] « The Hub - the global platform for human rights media and activism - 10/31/2007 13:06:04

[…] So it was especially timely for Brian Conley at Alive In Baghdad to e-mail us to say that he had an interview with a man who claims to have been beaten and abused by Iraqi security forces in […]


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